News

Posted on January 20, 2016

How Sleep’s WASH CYCLE Cleans the Brain: NIH Research posted by Raymond Rupert MD, MBA.

Cerebrospinal fluid (blue) flows through the brain and clears out toxins through a series of channels that expand during sleep. Maiken Nedergaard A mouse study suggests that sleep helps restore the brain by flushing out toxins that build up during waking hours. The brain has a “WASH CYCLE” during sleep. The results point to a potential […] Read More

Posted on December 20, 2015

When Hospital Paperwork Crowds Out Hospital Care By THERESA BROWN DEC. 19, 2015 New York Times

A FRIEND was recently hospitalized after a bicycle accident. At one point a nursing student, together with a more senior nurse, rolled a computer on wheels into the room and asked my friend to rate her pain on a scale of 1 to 10. She mumbled, “4 to 5.” The student put 5 into the […] Read More

Posted on December 9, 2015

HOW PHARMA CAN WIN IN THE DIGITAL WORLD: McKinsey- David Champagne (London), Amy Hung (New Jersey) & Olivier Leclerc (California)

The digital revolution continues to transform healthcare fundamentally, and many people believe that a tipping point is finally within reach. In 2014, digital health investments topped $6.5 billion, compared with $2.9 billion a year earlier.1 The critical question now for pharmaceutical companies is how to stay ahead of these changes. To answer it, we sought […] Read More

Posted on December 4, 2015

Debunking common myths about healthcare consumerism; Jenny Cordina, Rohit Kumar, and Christa Moss at McKinsey Dec 2015

 Consumers are taking an increasingly active role in healthcare decision making. What does that mean for payors and providers? Until recently, consumerism in the U.S. healthcare industry has moved slowly. However, several converging forces are likely to change the situation soon and result in a more dynamic market. Higher deductibles and copayments, greater transparency into […] Read More

Posted on December 3, 2015

Hidden health-care costs can be a shock for retirees; Anna Sharratt Globe and Mail Nov 19 2015

Canadians can expect to spend an average of $5,391 a year on out-of-pocket medical costs after 65, according to the 2014 BMO Wealth Institute Report. And these numbers will rise. Every Thursday, Randy Filinski drives a group of seniors to one of two government-sponsored physiotherapy sessions in Toronto’s Scarborough area and sees firsthand the realities […] Read More

Posted on December 2, 2015

TURING PHARMA SELLS DARAPRIM FOR $750 per pill – NOW IMPRIMIS PHARMA SELLS DARAPRIM FOR $1 per pill AND MAKES A PROFIT:

Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of Daraprim, a drug used by patients with weakened immune systems to fight parasitic infections, from $13.50 to $750. After public backlash, CEO Martin Shkreli announced that the price would be lowered, though he did not say how much. The Daraprim incident illustrates a failure in many regulated markets: delays that protect incumbents from potential competitors. […] Read More

Posted on December 1, 2015

NEW BLOOD TEST FOR CANCER IDENTIFIES THE PRESENCE AND ORIGIN OF THE TUMOUR:

Dr. D. James Morré, PhD – Co-Founder and Director of Research: Discovery of the ENOX2 Serum Cancer Marker The ENOX proteins comprise a family of cell surface enzymes that are essential to the growth phase of cell proliferation. One member of this family, ENOX2, is universally produced by cancer cells after malignant transformation due to […] Read More

Posted on November 22, 2015

THE FOUR IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR UP FRONT:

One thing patients can do is ask four simple questions when doctors are proposing an intervention, whether an X-ray, genetic test or surgery. First, what difference will it make? Will the test results change our approach to treatment? Second, how much improvement in terms of prolongation of life, reduction in risk of a heart attack […] Read More

Posted on November 22, 2015

COMPLEX POLYPHARMACY IN THE ELDERLY:

This is not the only recent finding that suggests that more care can produce worse health outcomes. A study from Israel of elderly patients with multiple health problems but still living in the community tried discontinuing medicines to see if patients got better. Not unusual for these types of elderly patients, on average, they were […] Read More

Posted on November 22, 2015

Are Good Doctors Bad for Your Health? Ezekiel J. Emanuel New York Times NOV. 21, 2015

Get me the best cardiologist” is our natural response to any heart problem. Unfortunately, it is probably wrong. Surprisingly, the right question is almost its exact opposite: At which hospital are all the famous, senior cardiologists away? One of the more surprising — and genuinely scary — research papers published recently appeared in JAMA Internal […] Read More

Posted on November 15, 2015

CRISPR: A TOOL FOR GENETIC ENGINEERING THAT CHANGES THE GAME- BIG TIME.

JENNIFER KAHN Bacteria were thought to have only a rudimentary immune system, which simply attacked anything unfamiliar on sight. But researchers speculated that Crispr, which stored fragments of virus DNA in serial compartments, might actually be part of a human-style immune system: one that keeps records of past diseases in order to repel them when […] Read More

Posted on November 10, 2015

WELCOME TO THE CLOUD HOSPITAL, WHERE BIG DATA TAKES ON MYSTERIOUS MEDICAL CONDITIONS; Fast Company

MEDICAL RESEARCHERS ARE POOLING THEIR DATA TO FIND DIAGNOSES AND CURES FOR PATIENTS WITH EXTREMELY RARE AND SOMETIMES UNDISCOVERED DISEASES. BY SEAN CAPTAIN You probably haven’t heard of a disease called arterial calcification due to deficiency of the CD73 enzyme, which causes painful calcium buildup in the joints and blood vessels. Discovered in 2011 through […] Read More

Posted on October 27, 2015

HALF OF ALL SURGERIES INVOLVE MEDICATION ERRORS: John Tozzi

About half of all surgeries involve some kind of medication error or unintended drug side effects, if a new study done at one of America’s most prestigious academic medical centers is any indication. The rate, calculated by researchers from the anesthesiology department at Massachusetts General Hospital who observed 277 procedures there, is startlingly high compared with […] Read More

Posted on October 18, 2015

CASE MANAGEMENT- WHAT IT IS AND HOW IT IS DONE FOR PATIENTS WITH ADDICTIONS

Case management involves a range of functions: Screening involves identifying whether someone might have a substance use problem and should have a comprehensive assessment. It may make use of a standardized instrument. Assessment identifies and defines a client’s major strengths and needs, characteristics and problems. Its goal is to generate the information necessary to refer […] Read More

Posted on October 16, 2015

Cognitive Bias and Medical Errors:

THINK OF HORSES, AND NOT ZEBRAS, whenever you hear hoof beats. Physicians know that this saying can be a helpful reminder when formulating a diagnosis of common medical conditions. But problems may arise in arriving at a diagnosis for some serious, but rare, medical conditions when the patient’s initial symptoms resemble those of more common […] Read More

Posted on October 16, 2015

COGNITIVE BIAS IN DIAGNOSIS:

Cognitive bias is a way of thinking that influences reasoning and decision making, sometimes resulting in inaccurate judgments. Cognitive biases (distortions of thinking) and affective biases (intrusion of the physician’s feelings) may interfere significantly with reaching a correct diagnosis. In recent years, many cognitive psychologists and physicians have studied diagnostic reasoning and decision making. What […] Read More

Posted on October 7, 2015

Tasha Kheiriddin: Pharmacare no panacea for health care costs; The NO side of the pharmacare argument

National Post Sept 2012 Health care may have been off the political radar this summer, but this week the issue is back with a vengeance. On the same day that the federal and provincial health ministers convened for their annual meeting in St. John’s, the dependably left-wing Canadian Centre of Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released a […] Read More

Posted on October 7, 2015

Mark Rovere: With Pharmacare, the cure is worse than the disease; The NO Side of the argument.

National Post | July 6, 2011 7:30 AM ET By Mark Rovere There has been much discussion in the past 10 years about whether Canada needs a national Pharmacare plan. Unfortunately, the plan is driven by ideology as opposed to common sense. While reform of provincial drug plans is necessary, a national government plan will […] Read More

Posted on October 6, 2015

Travel Health Insurance Association Survey Reveals What Canadians Don’t Know About Their Travel Health Insurance:

Toronto, ON (Sept. 30, 2015) – Canadians need to better understand their travel health insurance policies if they want to ensure they aren’t in debt for out-of-country medical expenses, based on findings from a Travel Health Insurance Association survey. Forty-seven per cent of respondents have never reviewed their policies even though 23 per centhave required […] Read More

Posted on October 6, 2015

NATIONAL PHARMACARE FOR CANADA- THE YES SIDE OF THE DEBATE- CMAJ March 2015

Steven G. Morgan PhD, Michael Law PhD, Jamie R. Daw BHSc MSc, Liza Abraham BSc, Danielle Martin MD MPubPol Competing interests: Michael Law reports receiving personal fees from Health Canada outside of the submitted work. Danielle Martin is a volunteer member of the board of Canadian Doctors for Medicare. Correspondence to: Steven Morgan, steve.morgan@ubc.ca Background: […] Read More

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